A student’s freshman year can be difficult. It can be overwhelming for a student to deal with a new school, new surroundings, and new classes plus an onset of responsibilities. Talking with your student about these issues can be a great benefit both for you and your student. It is extraordinarily important to remember that this is a learning experience. Mistakes will happen. Mistakes can be fixed.

Academic Calendar

August

Issue: Anxiety due to fitting in and making new friends.
Solution: Speak with your student about getting involved in an activity or organization that interests them. This is one of the easiest ways to meet people on campus that share similar interests. Also, encourage your student to think about the qualities they would like to see in a friend.
Issue: Students that are unsure of their major or career path might experience anxiety about classes beginning.
Solution: Suggest that your student speak with an academic advisor or visit the Career Center found in Raugust Library. Often, freshmen students can take a few basis classes while trying to figure out exactly what they want to do. Remember, changing a major is common and should not be discouraged. This will help ensure your student is happy in their upcoming career.

September

Issue: Students may be becoming overwhelmed with trying to balance their studies and social commitments. Also, assignments and tests are starting to be an item.
Solution: Suggest that your student purchase a planner from the bookstore to keep assignments and activities organized or use calendaring apps on smart phones or computers. Encourage them to assign time to the most important things first so they will have time for other activities.

October

Issue: As mid-terms and projects are approaching, your student may become stressed about studying and retaining course material.
Solution: Remind your student about the Academic Advising Center if they need additional tutoring outside the classroom. Encourage your student to check in with their professors concerning their current standing in the class and potential room for improvement.
Issue:Spring semester registration is coming up and your student might be unsure of the classes they should take.
Solution: Propose that your student meet their academic advisor for more information pertaining to classes offered and possible advising holds. The Career Center in Raugust Library might offer suggestions on possible internships or on-campus jobs related to your student’s interests or career aspirations.

November

Issue: Your student might be experiencing financial issues or stress as they reach the end of the semester and funds are dwindling.
Solution: Encourage your student to begin searching for an on-campus job. This is also a great time to talk about budgeting money and priorities.
Issue:Stress is starting to accumulate because the semester is about to end and students may begin to worry about grades for the end of the semester.
Solution: Remind your student to begin studying early. Suggest they speak with their professor about specific topics or concepts that they do not understand. Forming a study group with other classmates might also be a good option for your student.

December

Issue: Anxiety might be increasing as final exams and papers are due.
Solution: Encourage your student to finish the semester strong. Being organized during this time is crucial. Suggest having them write down all deadlines on a calendar and set aside time to study for tests and preparing papers.

January

Issue: Getting back into the groove of going to class, homework, studying, and student activity commitments might be difficult.
Solution: Suggest that your student create a calendar with all their upcoming dates and times of commitments, tests, and assignments for the semester. Getting prepared and organized early will reduce stress later on in the semester.
Issue: If the first semester was tough, your student might be anxious about returning to campus and starting their classes.
Solution: Talk with your student about what worked and what didn’t. Help them brainstorm possible improvements for this semester. Ask how you can help support them in their efforts. It might also be a good time to talk about goals.

February

Issue: With the winter weather and Valentine’s Day coming up, your student may be feeling a little lonely.
Solution: Encourage your student to attend on-campus events and meet new people.

March

Issue: Spring Break is coming up and your student is looking for something to do during the break.
Solution: Your student should consider using his or her spring break to do something constructive. One example would be the on campus Habitat for Humanity group which usually goes somewhere warm to build houses for those less fortunate during spring break.
Issue: As midterms approach, your student may feel overwhelmed with commitments and class assignments.
Solution: Provide your student some motivational words and talk with them about prioritizing all of their commitments. Encourage them to balance their school work by scheduling in their study time. If they start preparing early, they can use their social commitments as breaks.

April

Issue: Your student is preparing to register for the Fall Semester and some uncertainty may arise concerning their major, their course load, or their specific career path.
Solution: Discuss registering for classes with your student. Encourage them to seek advice from the Office of Academic Advising, a professor or staff member, or the Career Center. Suggest that they consider shadowing someone on their ideal job. Help them think about all their commitments (work, school, church, social, student involvement, etc.) when registering for classes to achieve the right number of hours for them.
Issue: As the school year is coming to an end, your student is probably thinking about their plans for the summer.
Solution: Talk with your student about their plans — are they looking at taking classes, studying abroad, pursuing an internship, working, etc? Discuss all the options and consider what is best for your student and your family.

May

Issue: By this time of their second semester, your student may think that final exams are no big deal. However, waiting until the last minute can cause issues and with summer break a few weeks away, it might be difficult for them to focus.
Solution: Talk to your student about studying early and being prepared for their last few weeks of school. Remind them that summer starts after finals are over.

For second year students, emphasis is placed on picking a major or career goal and if students are unsure, they can easily feel stressed. make sure that your student knows they have options and that there are resources especially for them. Encourage them to get involved and to find out about their interests.

Academic Calendar

August

Issue: Feelings of confusion and uncertainty may arise at the start of Sophomore Year. Your student may not be sure about whether they want to be in college.
Solution: Encourage your student to speak with their academic advisor about why they are here and what their plan is to graduate. Help your student make attainable goals and objectives for their second year.
Issue: Undeclared students may have feelings of anxiety because they are not sure of what major to choose. They may also be uncertain if their major chosen is the right choice.
Solution: Encourage your student to speak with an academic advisor or contact the Career Center to take an interest assessment.

September

Issue: Stress and being overwhelmed may be starting to take your student on an emotional roller coaster.
Solution: Students can take care of their emotional well-being by visiting the Career Center.

October

Issue: Students being to face anxiety over mid-terms and projects due at the halfway point of the semester.
Solution: Student should contact the Academic Advising Center for tutoring. Your student can also set up meetings with professors to discuss their success in class.

November

Issue: Your student might be experiencing financial issues or stress as they reach the end of the semester and funds are dwindling.
Solution: Encourage your student to begin searching for an on-campus job. This is also a great time to talk about budgeting money and priorities.
Issue: Stress is starting to accumulate because the semester is about to end and students may begin to worry about grades for the end of the semester.
Solution: Remind your student to begin studying early. Suggest that they speak with their professor about specific topics or concepts that they do not understand. Forming a study group with other classmates might also be a good option for your student.

December

Issue: Anxiety might be increasing as final exams and papers are due.
Solution: Encourage your student to finish the semester strong. Being organized during this time is crucial. Suggest having them write down all deadlines on a calendar and set aside time to study for tests and preparing papers.

January

Issue: Getting back into the groove of going to class, homework, studying, and student activity commitments might be difficult.
Solution: Suggest that your student create a calendar with all their upcoming dates and times of commitments, tests, and assignments for the semester. Getting prepared and organized early will reduce stress later on in the semester.

February

Issue: Thoughts of not having anything in common with friends made during the student’s first year of college
Solution: Students can look into ways to meet different people. They should check out different student organizations.
Issue: Anxiety about career interest/intership.
Solution: Students can visit the Career Center in Raugust Library to receive help with resume building and career or internship information.
Issue: Interest in Studying Abroad, but not sure how to go about it.
Solution: Students should visit their advisor to learn more.
Issue: Anxiety about funding for next school term.
Solution: Students should look for information about scholarships and grants on the financial aid website.

March

Issue: Spring Break is coming up and your student is looking for something to do during the break.
Solution: Your student should consider using his or her spring break to do something constructive. One example would be the on campus Habitat for Humanity group which usually goes somewhere warm to build houses for those less fortunate during spring break.
Issue: Unsupervised Spring Break trip.
Solution: Encourage your student to be responsible. Students should discuss the logistics of trips with other attendees.

April

Issue: Your student is preparing to register for the Fall Semester and some uncertainty may arise concerning their major, their course load, or their specific career path.
Solution: Discuss registering for classes with your student. Encourage them to seek advice from the office of Academic Advising, a professor or staff member, or the Career Center. Suggest that they consider shadowing someone on their ideal job. Help them think about all their commitments (work, school, church, social, student involvement, etc.) when registering for classes to achieve the right number of hours for them.
Issue: Mid-terms are approaching and procrastination has increased due to Spring Break.
Solution: Encourage your student to keep track of test dates and due dates for projects.
Issue: Social events add to procrastination and lack of focus.
Solution: Encourage your student to remember their priorities.

May

Issue: Plans for the summer.
Solution: If your student is considering taking summer classes, they should talk with their academic advisor.

For third year students, the end is in sight. Students might be getting antsy for graduation or might be a little scared about the upcoming job search. This is a great time for students to focus on their soon-to-be profession. Suggest that they find a part-time job, internship, or community involvement that will instill in them key skills for after graduation. This will not only prepare them, but also keep them engaged in their studies.

Academic Calendar

Fall Semester

Issue: Reaching the half-way point of college – being worried about taking the correct classes in order to graduate.
Solution: Suggest that your student meet with their academic advisor to discuss their graduation plan. Students are encouraged to establish a relationship with a faculty mentor.
Issue: Enhancing Leadership Skills
Solution: Encourage your student to participate in on-campus activities. Students should become involved in student organizations. Encourage your student to take on a leadership position and to seek out volunteer opportunities.
Issue: Feelings of being lost, not knowing what their calling is or what they want to do in life.
Solution: Talk with your student and help them reflect on who they are and who they want to be. Help them consider what their values are and what they are passionate about.
Issue: Involvement overload is interfering with school work and social life.
Solution: Remind your student to find a balance between activities, school, and down-time while always taking their priorities into consideration.
Issue: Contemplating Study Abroad
Solution: Students should visit with their academic advisor for assistance with finding a study abroad opportunity and/or researching grant and scholarship opportunities to fund the trip.
Issue: Job/Internship search preparation
Solution: Suggest that your student visit the Career Center and visit with a career specialist. Student should create or update their resume, attend seminars to sharpen interview skills, and set up mock interviews.

Spring Semester

Issue: Contemplating graduate/professional school.
Solution: Students should research schools with their program of interest. Remind your student to make note of the school’s requirements and to look into the deadlines and costs of taking practice tests for graduate entrance exams.
Issue: Needing an internship or job for the summer.
Solution: Encourage your student to attend job and career fairs and to visit the Career Center.
Issue: Plans for Spring Break
Solution: If your student is planning a Spring Break trip, remind them to make sure that everyone attending is in agreement about expectations for the trip. Your student may also be interested in checking out information on alternative Spring Break options such as Habitat for Humanity.
Issue: Anxiety about final exams/papers/projects
Solution: Suggest that your student meet with professors and/or seek tutoring.

Graduation is a big part of the senior year of college. Senioritis will begin to set in and finishing might become difficult. Encourage your student to stay focused and pay close attention to their graduation requirements and deadlines. For some students, it may be helpful to meet with their advisor to make sure everything is in order. It is also smart for your student to seek career advice from the Career Center.

Academic Calendar

Fall Semester

Issue: Anxiety about meeting graduation requirements.
Solution: Suggest that your student see their academic advisor to make sure they are on track for graduation. They may also wish to talk to a faculty member about post-graduation plans.
Issue: Applying for Graduation
Solution: Remind your students to look out for information about graduation requirements and registration through their UJ email. They should also feel free to stop in at the Registrar’s Office in Liechty Center/Taber Hall.
Issue: What to do after Graduation
Solution: Encourage your student to make a plan for what they want to do whether that means getting a job or attending graduate school. Make note of the steps needed to achieve those goals.
Issue: Uncertainty about attending professional or graduate school and requirements for applying.
Solution: Encourage your student to research programs and schools of interest. Remind them to pay close attention to requirements for the program and institution. Students should begin studying for entrance exams to be taken during the fall semester.
Issue: Problems looking for a job
Solution: Suggest that your student attend job fairs and visit the Career Center for more information about current openings. Students may also set up a mock interview to sharpen their interview skills. Remind your student to clean up their resume and cover letter. Students should ask faculty members/past employers to serve as references. This might also be time to upgrade their wardrobe.
Issue: Senioritis or lack of motivation
Solution: Encourage your student to stay focused. Remind them to remember what it is that they are about to accomplish and to stay motivated. Help your student remember their priorities.

Spring Semester

Issue: Anxiety about leaving college and uncertainty about being out in the real world.
Solution: Suggest that your student speak with a friend who may be facing the same anxiety or to seek services from the Career Center.
Issue: Staying in contact with friends and faculty/staff from the college.
Solution: Suggest that your student make sure they get current contact information from everyone they want to stay in contact with. Also, now is time they will be joining that elite group of people known as University of Jamestown Alumni. They should visit the Alumni and Friends website to sign up for the alumni directory.
Issue: Making a Financial Plan for post-graduation
Solution: Encourage your student to make a budget for all of their expenses. Students should also check on deferment guidelines for student loans and make sure all expenses owed to the University have been paid.
Issue: Celebrating Senior Year
Solution: Remind your student to prioritize and make sure they still have time for studying and school work.
Issue: It’s Senior Year
Solution: Tell your student to enjoy it.